The Art Of Gift Giving

I remember long time ago when I was a kid, my older sister would tuck me in bed whenever my mother wasn’t around. Yet, before I would sleep, I would ask her to tell me a lovely story. One time, she narrated to me the story of St. Nicholas from whose life the tradition of gift giving by Santa Claus was derived. She told me then that there was a bishop who always anonymously gave gifts to little children and his name was Nicholas. As a child, I was so impressed with the story of the life of Saint Nicholas that I began to value gifts and the art of gift giving. Gift giving is too diametrically opposed to our natural drives as human beings. We always wanted to be loved, to be pampered, to be babied, and to be given gifts. But once we engage in gift giving, we usually go beyond our very nature and transcend our very own self. In a way, St. Nicholas was right in starting the tradition of gift giving because most people are highly individualistic. In fact, the prevailing philosophy nowadays in the Western World is rugged individualism. Yet, the concept of gift giving runs in contrast to this prevalent rugged individualism, and hence, gift giving should be encouraged to counteract the growing individualistic tendency of humanity.

The Art of Gift Giving

Gift giving focuses our attention away from ourselves towards another person. A good giver always looks at the interest of the other person and tries to make that person happy with a gift. Hence, when practiced repeatedly, the simple act of gift giving becomes an art that allows us to grow as a person. It can also become a useful means of building lasting and deeper relationships. It would definitely enhance our friendships and relationships, and it would allow us to invest more on our emotional banks, leading other people to value and trust us. Hence, we should make it a habit to value other people, and we can show that we value them by giving them special gifts every once in a while.

The Best Christmas Gifts we Can Ever Give

The best Christmas Gifts may be different for each person, but the gifts that are most valuable are the ones that are not concrete and material. You may shower a person with thousands of material gifts, but if you are not present to them as an individual, say for instance as a parent, your material gifts will amount to nothing. Likewise, the love that we shower other people is often immaterial and not concrete. Yet, this love can be readily felt, and any sensitive person will readily appreciate our love for them. But love can also be concretized in the act of giving material gifts. Since we are not spirit and we need to see something concrete, a material gift can become a concrete show of our love for someone else. A well-intended Christmas gift can readily relay our sincerest love and affection for another person. For this reason, we can never really downplay the importance of gift giving, and like St. Nicholas, we should always engage in it as a concrete manifestation of our appreciation and love for other people.